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Sunday Scribble – “Autumn”

Autumn

The fires were getting worse, a tell-tale sign that autumn was on its way. The dry leaves, twigs, and old trees provided perfect fodder for the wild dragons’ attempts at keeping their territories warm.

“Why they can’t just fly south for the cold season like birds, I’ll never know,” Brom grumbled. “They’ve wings, don’t they?”

“They’re more reptiles than birds,” Simon said, hefting a couple of buckets of water over to the trough. It was to keep a ready supply of water in case some of the crops did begin to burn. “With their territorial instincts, they’re more apt to warm up their surroundings than go elsewhere. I’m sure most have hoards to protect—”

“Spare us the biology lesson, please,” Luella said. She was resting on an overturned bucket, having used her energy on creating a raincloud to quench a brush fire that had gotten dangerously close to the local town’s wheat fields.

“I’d be able to spare it if Brom paid attention when I explained it last year and the previous year before that,” Simon said. He ducked away from the handful of sand Brom tossed his way. “Seriously, you complain every year.”

“Probably because I don’t like using my skills to shovel dirt around to prevent forest fires,” Brom said. “I’d rather be getting paid for bashing in the skulls of bandits.”

“Oh, c’mon.” I dumped out half a bag of sand on a pile of dead undergrowth, ensuring that it wouldn’t catch fire should the dragons make their way over to the crops. “There’s plenty of payment opportunity in helping villages with chores like these.”

Glancing up, I stared at the villages doing the same work as us in the distance, working hard to prevent their fields and homes for burning should a dragon arrive.

My gaze caught Luella’s narrowed one. “How many of these villages still have their coin purses?” she asked.

“Most of them, I suspect,” I said cheerfully, nudging around the pile of sand with my foot to even it out. “Honestly, I haven’t lifted a purse from a person today.”

“But if you found one unattended,” Brom said, “say, with other supplies lying about, then…”

“Finders-keepers,” Simon and I chanted in unison.

Luella’s baby-blues rolled. “You’re all horrible.”

“Says a lot about how used to us you are if that’s your only reaction,” Brom said.

Our mage gave him the driest look I’d ever seen her muster before turning to watch some of the other villagers. I kicked some more sand around, more than ready to quit for a snack, as my attention wandered to the inn rooms we had secured for the night.

“Are we done yet?” Apparently Simon had similar thoughts.

“Perhaps.” Luella stood up, stumbled momentarily until Brom caught her elbow, and added, “The headman is coming closer.”

I stood up straighter, my hands deftly double-checking that the “found” purses were well hidden in my pockets, and waited with my companions as the headman caught up to us.

“Thank you all for your help,” Elsworth said, giving us a small bow. Luella gave a brief one in return, Brom inclined his head in a nod, I didn’t even think to join in, and Simon’s gaze was fixed on the smiley face he was toeing in the sand.

“The preparations went so much smoother with such strong help.” Elsworth clapped a hand on Brom’s shoulder, and our warrior’s free hand twitched. It was a feat that Brom didn’t shake off the contact. Had it been a few years prior, I would have marveled at Brom not outright punching the headman.

“We’re always happy to help for the right price,” Simon chirped with a cheeky wink.

Elsworth chuckled. “Ah, that’s right, always know what your work is worth! Come on back to the square and I’ll get my assistant to give you your wages before you turn in for the night.” He turned away to head back before glancing over his shoulders at us. “By the way, if you happen to find a red-skinned coin purse, please let me know. I seemed to have misplaced it.”

As soon as Elsworth was a few paces away, Luella shot me a glare while Brom raised an eyebrow inquisitively.

“Finders-keepers,” I whispered to Simon’s muffled laughter.

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Posted by on October 1, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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Sunday Scribble — “Toasty”

Toasty

“Alright, what’s the plan?” Simon asked. We were as dignified as we could be while hiding in the bushes that grew wildly along the path toward the dragon’s tower.

“We kill it,” Brom said. “Who needs a plan?”

“How are we just going to kill it?” I asked. “It’s a flying furnace!”

“Shhh.” Luella held a finger in front of her lips, but her eyes were trained on the dragon resting atop of the tower’s roof. “Perhaps someone can distract it, bring it down lower, then a couple of others can help slay it. The fourth can find a way into the tower and see if there is anyone in there who can be freed.”

“You mean if there’s anyone who is not a crispy corpse?” I asked dryly while holding back a sneeze.

Casually, Luella responded, “That’s right.”

“Well, you have the lock picks.” Simon nudged me. “I vote you do the tower climbing. Who wants to be the distraction?” The rest of us stared at him, and he rolled his eyes. “Seriously, why am I always the distraction?”

“You have the biggest mouth,” Brom said without missing a beat. “Lu and I will be your back-up. Get the dragon low enough so my axe can impale it and Lu’s spells can reach it.”

Simon grumbled even as he unhooked his harp from the back of his pack. “Think it likes folk music?”

“Since when can you play folk music on a harp?” Bard asked.

“Since always,” Simon retorted. “Your uncouth ears just can never tell the difference.”

“Be careful,” I said as Simon left our wayward hiding place. I didn’t take too much longer in leaving as well, taking a roundabout way to reach the base of the tower. Huddling in the shadows of the stone building, I carefully looked up, praying to whatever gods Luella calls on for her spells that the dragon wouldn’t notice me.

Judging by how quickly the reptile’s head spun around when I heard the first plinks of Simon’s harp, I wouldn’t have to worry. While Simon’s music wasn’t that bad, he was a much better distraction than a musician.

I paused long enough to allow the dragon’s wings to stretch out, catching the wind as it brought along snatches of Simon’s song. As soon as the dragon took off from the roof, I circled the tower to find the door by the base and got to work on the lock.

Three lock picks later, I was inside and face with a spiraling staircase. I took them two at a time until I started to get a stitch in my side, and any sense of urgency went out the very few windows I passed.

“This is punishment for not joining the others on Brom’s workout regimen at the last town, isn’t it?” I muttered to whatever god wished to listen.

There was a screech from outside the tower and the telltale sound of shattering ice. Luella must have used some sort of freezing spell, no doubt to counter any sort of fire that the dragon expelled. Brom’s explicit-filled voice shouted with battle cries and rage, accompanied by the occasional crash.

All while some cheery folk music was plucked from a harp.

“Finally.” I reached the landing at the top of the stairs only to face a heavy, black iron door. Jiggling the knob, I hoped that I had enough lock picks to break through the lock mechanisms.

“Who’s there?” asked a voice from inside.

“A rescue party,” I responded. “Don’t worry, we’ll get you out in a few minutes—”

“Rescue party?” The voice was utterly baffled. “I didn’t order a rescue party.”

“The village did,” I said, “and we always deliver. Sit tight, I’ll get the door open soon–!”

The door swung open from the inside and, after regaining my balance from almost pitching forward, I found myself staring at a skinny, dark-skinned man, his eyebrows furrowed as he scrutinized me.

I took a deep breath as realization dawned. “You don’t need rescuing.”

“I do not,” he said with a simple head shake. “If you excuse me, I need to see what is upsetting Toasty—”

“Toasty?!”

“Well, yes, one of the first things he burned was my bread when he was no bigger than us—”

“You have GOT to be kidding me!” I threw my hands up in the air. “The rest of my party was distracting the dragon so I could rescue whoever was stuck here in the tower.”

“I suggest you call them off,” the man said mildly, turning to the large window on the far side of the wall. “I would be very upset if they hurt Toasty, and I’m sure you would be upset if Toasty hurt them.”

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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“Have a Prompt!” Saturday #91

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Posted by on April 15, 2017 in Prompts

 

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Sunday Scribble – “Shiver”

Shiver

Her breath came out as clouds, dissipating in the cold air while she shivered in her boots. Guard duty in the dead of winter was unnecessary, in her opinion. Who in their right mind would attempt to storm their northern fortress — armed with some of the country’s best archers and swordsmen — during a season ripe with blizzards?

She could just imagine her captain scolding her for thinking such thoughts.

“Our northern fortress is the strongest because we’re always prepared,” Aaron would say. “If our enemies think we’re slacking off at all, we’ll have already lost.”

The only thing I’ve lost, Gia thought, is the feeling in my toes.

She glanced over at the guard tower, hoping that it was nearly her turn for a break by the fire. Standing on the wall in the frigid air made Gia certain her nose would fall off due to frostbite, and the rest of her body would be too numb to notice.

Gia closed her eyes, imagining the warmth of the fireside. The crackles and pops of the flames snacking on logs and sticks, the heat rising to bring a healthy glow back to her cheeks…

She took a deep breath through the scarf tucked under her armor, actually being able to smell the smoke.

Gia’s eyes popped open, knowing her imagination wasn’t that powerful. Shadows pooled around her, darker than anything the blizzard clouds could cast. She looked up and shouted the alarm.

The dragons were here.

 
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Posted by on December 4, 2016 in Scribbles

 

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“Have a Prompt!” Saturday #33

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Posted by on March 5, 2016 in Prompts

 

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Short Story Sunday – Camp NaNo Excerpt #3 (April 2015)

Excerpt from NPC (#3)
A continuation of last week’s excerpt

Mount Cataclysm exploded.

Kurt didn’t hear about it right away. He had been around the Central Hub, taking a shift in helping new players with directions and what the game was all about when he noticed that a sudden abundance of players were respawning in the neutral zone. Most had Fire dragons, or at least Spirit hatchlings with the telltale red glow that signaled that Fire was their preferred element for evolving. Almost all of the players were as bewildered as the new players when they realized what had happened.

“The volcano erupted,” players were suddenly saying, and all of the garbles and gibberish that the crowd had generated turned into an excited buzz. Kurt wasn’t sure what was so exciting about a volcano erupting, but he excused himself from the new player he had been helping to soar with Noodles over to Mount Cataclysm.

If Mount Cataclysm had been scheduled to erupt, wouldn’t Animus or Gears have told the NPCs? Or was this an attempt to allow the players more action, more of a hero role rather than just as explorers?

Kurt had arrived in time to see Brent’s Foxtail emit a stream of flames at an engulfed boulder that had been heading their way. The Fire dragon’s efforts had succeeded in pushing the boulder away from them and the few players that they were with only to have it crush another pair of players. Kurt watched as they flickered out of existence, positive that they would respawn back in the Central Hub. The rest of the scene was just as chaotic.

Without too much of Kurt’s direction, Noodles blasted away at the spewing lava and rocks with her own streams of water. Other Water dragon masters, NPCs and players alike, slowly and steadily came over to the area once news of Mount Cataclysm’s eruption reached them. Earth dragons appeared to try to up heave the ground, to bury the flames and unruly rocks, while Wind dragons directed the airs in attempts to control where the lava and boulders fell. The Fire dragon masters could only do so much with their breaths only succeeding in furthering the flames.

“Brent,” Kurt called out, doing his best to have his voice carry over the cacophony of crashing boulders, sizzling flames, and hissing water. “Brent! Is there anyone in the mountain?”

“No idea,” Brent called back, pulling Foxtail away from the erupting site. “What, you suggesting that I go in and save any trapped avatars?”

“Your Fire dragons can resist the heat,” Kurt pointed out. “Why wouldn’t you go to see if they need help?”

“Would they help us if we got trapped?” Brent asked.

“Some would say that’s the point of being a player in a game like this,” Kurt said. “In most games, the players rescue the NPCs, not the other way around.”

“Yeah, well…” Brent took a deep breath. “In most games, NPCs don’t feel as much as we do. Kurt, have you ever gotten into such trouble that you had to respawn?”

Noodles took a sharp turn and Kurt nearly tumbled off of her back. His mind had been on the question, not on the scene around him. Eventually he answered, “No, no, I haven’t.”

“Do you know if you would respawn?” Brent asked. Kurt didn’t have an answer for that, and Brent shook his head. “I didn’t think you would. The players will be fine. If they get trapped, all they gotta do is walk through fire and burn enough to respawn and come back to life. As for us? I don’t know if we’d come back from the dead, and I’m not willing to try it out for a couple of avatars who aren’t even real in this world.”

“What are you, a coward?” Leslie was suddenly by their side, and Rosie grunted as she caught a boulder in the air and tossed it into the surrounding sea.

“For my life?” Brent shot back. “Yes!”

“To help the players is what we’re here for,” Leslie said. “It’s why we were created.”

“I’m all for helping,” Brent said, “you know, giving directions, doing easy delivery or rescue missions, but not for giving them my life.”

Noodles hung back, panting, and Kurt could only stroke what he could reach of her neck. Foxtail twisted to stretch in front of them and block an incoming flying sphere of lava.

“The moderators care too much about us to not let us respawn,” Kurt eventually said. “Why create us just to allow us to easily die?”

“I’m not as positive about our creators’ good virtues as you are,” Brent said. “I just don’t know if they could do that. If I was as sure that this program stretched to let us respawn as sure as I am a Fire dragon master, then, yeah, I’d be in that volcano doing search and rescue, but…” He trailed off, shaking his head.

As if on cue, all three of the NPCs’ wristwatches flashed red with messages from avatars trapped inside the mountain. They mentioned boulders blocking the path and how they didn’t know where lava was flowing down. One wrong break through the mountain’s walls, and they could send lava gushing inside the mountain.

Noodles wouldn’t be able to handle going through the volcano, not with how worn out she was with fighting the eruption from the outside. Kurt glanced from Brent to Leslie and back to Brent. Brent only moved to signal Foxtail to back off from the volcano.

Leslie glowered at Brent. “We’re NPCs,” she repeated, “here to help the avatars. I’m not going to go against my programming!”

She and Rosie dove toward the volcano, flying tightly and twisting whenever necessary to avoid the volcanic debris. With a roar, Rosie broke through the side of the mountain, making a dragon-shaped hole just big enough for them to lead a couple of trapped dragons and their masters out in single file.

Kurt didn’t have time to dwell on Leslie’s or the trapped avatars’ states. Instead, he directed Noodles to help the evacuation efforts around Mount Cataclysm’s base. Noodles still had to rebuild her reservoir of water powers, but she could still herd and hide players and Spirit hatchlings from tumbling debris. Brent eventually directed Foxtail to do the same, his Fire dragon’s bulk doing more blocking than anything.

A whistling from the mountain base’s shoreline stole Kurt’s attention, and he blinked at seeing the wide grin on Pyrobot’s face.

“Hey, everyone!” the player called out. “We got a couple of dragons that are free to tow players to the Central Hub! Come and grab a hold of Mustang and Clyde! Four players to a dragon, as long as you don’t mind getting wet.”

There was Pyrobot’s friend Hydroid helping other avatars to hold onto his and Pyrobot’s Spirit hatchlings, now having grown strong enough to allow a few players to hold on while they swam through the water to the neutral zone. Kurt had Noodles herd the avatars they had been harboring toward Hydroid, and Kurt shared a grateful nod to the player.

With the help of so many NPCs and players, Mount Cataclysm’s island was soon evacuated, and they were able the watch the last bits of the eruption come to a close from the Central Hub. Kurt had all but forgotten about Leslie and Rosie until he overheard a player speaking to another about “the Earth dragon and her master,” and Kurt eavesdropped long enough to know that Leslie had directed the players out of the mountain before getting trapped herself.

Kurt was soaring on Noodles back toward the volcano and they nearly crashed into Brent and Foxtail while trying to find the hole that Rosie had created into the mountain.

“She’s not here anymore,” Brent said even as Noodles and Kurt snaked their way into the found hole. Brent called after him, “Use your built-in scanner, Kurt! You can’t find Leslie!”

Kurt scoured the narrow pathway, finding nothing, no trace of Leslie or her Earth dragon. His code’s scanner couldn’t find her programming.

Brent’s last shouts echoed across the empty walls. “She’s gone, Kurt! Leslie’s gone and she’s never going to respawn! To the administrators, her programming was deleted. To us, she’s dead.”

 
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Posted by on April 19, 2015 in Scribbles

 

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Short Story Sunday – Camp NaNo Excerpt #2 (April 2015)

Excerpt from NPC (#2)
A continuation of last week’s excerpt.

The landslides were just the beginning.

Kurt spent more time riding Noodles around the Dragon Tamer realm helping other NPCs save trapped players and their avatars in the recent week than he ever had in the months that the game had been open to the public. From avalanches in the frozen tundra in the northwest to quicksand and sticky swamps in the southeast, the NPCs had their virtual hands full. Kurt rarely saw Animus. When he did get a chance to see the moderator, it was she who found him just to ask for a brief update on the troubles that had been happening around the game. Kurt didn’t think too much of it. Rather, he was busy with his own duties.

Such as responding to a call with other NPCs from avatars stranded in the middle of the sea with too-small dragon partners to help them get back to shore.

“What happened?” Leslie was the first NPC to call down to the players clinging to a slowly sinking ship. It seemed to be a party with about half a dozen players, some with full-grown element dragons but most with Spirit dragons getting ready to evolve.

The player – username Nitrogue – with the largest dragon, an Earth dragon with the name Goliath, spoke up from the ship’s bow. “We hit some of the squid monsters. Our dragons fought ’em off, but not before they cracked a hole in the boat. We’re too far from shore to swim without drowning and some of our dragons aren’t big enough to carry even one person let alone two.”

“Where did you think you were going with such young dragons in the first place?” Leslie snapped. Kurt brought Noodles around to the front of the ship, allowing a couple of the avatars to cling to his dragon rather than the floating debris. Another Water dragon master NPC, Simon, did the same.

“We wanted to explore the other islands on the other side of the sea,” Nitrogue said, pointing to the pixilated landmasses that were off in the distance.

“You didn’t happen to think you were too inexperienced?” Leslie asked. She climbed up as close to the head of her large Earth dragon so two of the avatars with Spirit dragons could sit on Rosie’s back. “If your dragons are Spirits around here in the neutral zone, what makes you think you won’t end up getting your butt kicked and respawning back here?”

Nitrogue huffed as he perched atop of his own dragon after being sure that the rest of the players were secure on their dragons or hitching a ride with an NPC and his or her dragon. “Look, it was supposed to be a challenge. We’re just trying to give this game a self-imposed difficulty setting and seeing how long we’d survive in an unknown environment.”

“Are the monsters not sufficient enough of a challenge for you?” Kurt asked.

“The monsters are fine,” Nitrogue said. “It’s cool to be able to defeat them and defend the realm and whatever. It’s just that…” The player trailed off and didn’t continue until Kurt turned around, silently encouraging the player to speak. “You NPCs are cool and all, and there’s no telling how long we would have been stranded in the ocean like that, but most MMORPGs that I’ve played have the NPCs in situations where they need to be saved by the players. Not the other way around, you know? Certainly not with NPCs that know that they exist only in a game.”

Kurt glanced at Leslie, but the female non-playable character shook her head at Nitrogue’s response. “Sorry you feel that way,” Leslie responded with a tone that sounded as if she was anything but. “I bet the administrators thought the same as well when they first started the game, but with the sheer amount of players that got into trouble with stupid ideas like you guys, they needed a few extra hands.”

“Maybe something’s wrong with the game then,” Nitrogue said, “if the administrators need so many self-aware NPCs.”

“What could be wrong?” Kurt asked gently.

“I don’t know.” Nitrogue shrugged. “The difficulty settings?”

“If it’s difficult enough,” Leslie retorted, “then you wouldn’t have needed to go off into the ocean on a sinking ship.”

That effectively ended all conversation until the group returned to the main land. There Nitrogue and his party gave the NPCs a grudging thank you before they went off toward the Central Hub.

“I don’t understand,” Kurt said as the NPCs watched the players go. “What could be wrong with Dragon Tamer?”

Leslie scratched the back of her head. “Not sure about that,” she said. “Seems like some of the more ambitious players need something to reach for that have more to do with them than with natural disasters in the environment. Maybe we should see if Gears or Animus is on.”

“I haven’t seen either of them in a while,” Kurt said. He gave Noodles’ neck a rub before directing her to follow Leslie and Rosie.

“I know his favorite spot in the Wildlands,” Leslie said. “If he’s on, he’ll be there.”

“How often do you see him?” Kurt asked.

“Probably about as often as you would see Animus,” Leslie said, glancing back at him. “You see her far more often than you see Gears, right?”

“That’s true,” Kurt said. “We tend to find each other around the landscapes that cater more to Water and Wind dragons, while Gears and yourself—”

“We’re more Fire and Earth,” she finished for him. “It works out, I guess. Certain NPCs reporting to certain administrators. Makes sense.”

Kurt merely nodded in response and the rest of the ride to the Wildlands was silent. Eventually, the pair of NPCs landed at the edge of the Labyrinth that looked out over the Wildlands.

The Wildlands had an appropriate name. While the landscape didn’t have quite enough trees to be called a forest, it was rather green and brown with foliage. Thorny and sticky bushes and undergrowth were a favorite hiding spots for the monsters that plagued the area, and it granted those who wished for their Spirit hatchling to grow into an Earth element dragon plenty of opportunities to gain experience. There were areas spotted with barren earth, rich in yellows and reds in color, which boasted sandy terrains and valleys, generally hiding quicksand if one was not swift on his or her feet. While Kurt had some experience in the Wildlands, he was more than content to follow Leslie’s footsteps obediently.

Leslie confidently strode through the Wildlands, finding paths and easier roads to follow rather than the crude trails that most players and NPCs, Kurt himself included, would have taken. She deftly stepped over quicksand spots and Kurt did his best to mimic her footsteps. He was proud that Noodles had to pull him out of a tight spot only once. It wasn’t too long that Leslie pulled back a curtain of vines to reveal a small cave lit with fireflies.

“Just follow the path,” Leslie said, allowing Kurt to go first. Noodles shrunk down to fit in Kurt’s arms and he absently stroked her back as he marveled at the colorful glows around him. The cave was simple to navigate with enough of the bugs to light the path, even as they began to dwindle in number. When Kurt passed the last violet-hued firefly, the pathway became brighter as they emerged into a grassy clearing.

“What is this place?” Kurt asked as Leslie stepped up beside him. Rosie was perched atop of her head.

“Don’t think it has a name,” Leslie admitted after pausing to no doubt run through her memory files. With a quirked smile to Kurt, she added, “It’s probably some little nook that Gears added to the game at the last minute to give himself a spot to work from.”

Kurt shared her smile as he followed her down into the clearing. In the middle of the area were a couple of rather large trees. In between them was an equally large hammock stretched across, large enough for the giant Earth dragon to comfortable lay down and take a snooze at full size. Kurt realized that the Earth dragon was Gears’ dragon Soreth and, upon inspecting the creature closer, Kurt realized that there was Gears himself lounging against Soreth’s neck.

Holographic images with bits and pieces of code were in front of the Dragon Tamer’s administrator as he typed away on a matching keyboard. The images were created from varying shades of green and gray, with their source emitting from the goggles obscuring Gears’ face. Every so often Gears would touch the holographic screen and flip or swipe it to reveal another page of code and programming before continuing to type away.

Despite how absorbed he appeared to be in his work, Gears somehow had noticed that Leslie and Kurt had entered his hideaway. Without looking down at them, Gears smiled and greeted them with, “Hello. Is there something I can do for you?”

“We just rescued a bunch of stupid players,” Leslie said, getting right down to the point. Her choice of words made Gears glance down at them, one dark eyebrow rising from behind his avatar’s goggles before he pushed the goggles up to rest at the top of his forehead.

Leslie elaborated. “A few of us caught a literal S.O.S. message and found half a dozen avatars clinging to a sinking ship in the middle of the ocean. Players claimed that they wanted to try a self-imposed difficulty challenge or something.”

“Maybe I should up the levels of some of the monsters, then,” Gears said. “It can’t be too much or too close to the Central Hub and the starting players, of course, but—”

“We’re not sure if it’s just that,” Kurt said. Soreth woke up and snaked down to the ground, allowing Gears to hop off and stand in front of the NPCs. The administrator had a shorter avatar than either of the two NPCs and he didn’t seem to mind looking up at Kurt and Leslie.

“Tell me what you’re thinking,” Gears said.

“The players that we rescued,” Kurt continued, “said something about how strange it was that us non-playable characters are this self-aware and fully capable of defending ourselves. Apparently it is not the norm in a video game for the non-playable characters to rescue the players. Generally it’s the other way around.”

“That’s true,” Gears said with a nod. “In all honesty, Animus and I hadn’t meant for you all to be this smart, but I think of it as a good thing. We have less to worry about with you NPCs around to help take care of the realm, and I don’t like creating NPCs just for the sole purpose of having them routinely get into trouble for the sake of players’ quests.”

“The players don’t feel the same way,” Leslie pointed out. She crossed her arms, leaning against one of the area’s large trees. “What should we do about it? I don’t like the idea of pandering to them, but you can change the way I feel if you need to.”

“I wouldn’t do that,” Gears said.

“Why not?” Kurt found himself asking.

Gears tilted his head, floundering a bit from the question. “Your personalities evolved from the simple two or three traits that Animus and I had originally programmed into you. It wouldn’t be fair to take that away from you.”

“While I appreciate the sentiment,” Leslie said, “you’re the big boss. It really doesn’t matter to us what you do to our programming. We don’t have a choice.”

“Yes you do,” Gears insisted. “That’s why I don’t want to make changes to your code unless you’re okay with it.”

“I am okay with it, though,” Leslie said. “Do whatever you want.”

“Not like that,” Gears said with a shake of his head. “The NPCs are the population of this world. It’s real to you guys. We don’t want to change things unless we absolutely have to or it would be for the better for you guys.”

“What about the players?” Kurt asked. “Isn’t the point of this place to create an entertaining and stimulating game play experience for them?”

“Of course it is,” Gears said.

“Logically,” Kurt said, “you should be more concerned with how they feel about the Dragon Tamer realm. Not us.”

Gears rubbed the back of his head. “I… I do understand what you’re saying,” he said. “I still wouldn’t… It wouldn’t feel ethically right to me or to Animus if we messed with your world. You’re more self-aware than we had originally realized…”

“Is that bad?” Kurt asked.

Gears gave him a brief smile. “No, not at all. Getting back to these players that you rescued…”

 
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Posted by on April 12, 2015 in Scribbles

 

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