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Scribble Sunday – “Static”

Continuation of last week.

Static

The machines were talking to me again. Hooked up to them, I couldn’t get away. Instead, I curled into a ball on the hospital table and closed my eyes tightly, imagining my normal life from before the fire. I was alone in the room, but the doors were not as thick as the staff thought.

“…the trauma awakened some mutation in her genome,” some doctor was telling the Fosters outside of the exam room. “I have a theory that many genomes have the ability to be mutated, granting people with extraordinary talents, such as Ms. Parker’s ability to hear electronics.”

“How did the trauma of a fire mutate her?” Mr. Foster asked.

“The fire was started from the lightning storm that night,” the doctor said. “Perhaps the electricity is what links Ms. Parker to the electronics, not the fire.”

“How can we help her?” Mrs. Foster asked.

“I don’t believe there is a cure,” the doctor said. “It’s quite a scientific breakthrough, actually. Imagine others with the ability to communicate with electronics. We could send robots to join the army with soldiers controlling them from a safe point–”

“We’re talking about a young girl, not a robot,” Mrs. Foster interrupted. “She just lost her parents–”

“Yes, yes, I apologize.” The doctor’s tone didn’t sound that sorry. “You may be doing all you can to help her now. Giving her a roof over her head, people she can rely on…”

But they’re not my family.

“…However, we would like you to continue bringing her here for testing,” the doctor continued. “We’ll do our best to find a way to alleviate these… uncomfortable sensations that she’s going through, perhaps learn more about it.”

“What about school?” Mr. Foster asked. “We’re still giving her some time off, but eventually she will have to go back. Will she be safe enough to continue at the high school?”

“That is to be determined, unfortunately,” the doctor said. “She’ll have to practice shutting out the electronics in order to function properly.”

Never thought I would want to go back to school, but if it meant getting rid of this damned mutation, then I’d do anything.

“Any suggestions on how she should practice?” Mrs. Foster asked.

The doctor paused before saying, “Just try to ignore them? Meditate? I’m sorry, but this is new to us as well.”

Thanks for nothing, Doc.

The door swung open again and I looked up at Mrs. Foster’s smiling face. I sat up without a word and let her pat my shoulder, resting her hand there while guiding me out of the hospital. My head was low, avoiding the other patrons of the place as we left.

Willow greeted me with homework once we returned to their house.

“I told the teachers you really weren’t up for it,” she said, “but they insisted that I bring this to you so you won’t fall too far behind. Mrs. Davis was pretty nice about it, actually, she said if you could just skim over this stuff, maybe read a bit of A Tale of Two Cities if you’re bored, then that’d be great. If not, don’t worry about it, she’ll get you caught up whenever you get back to school.”

“Thanks,” I said, and abandoned the pile of homework beside my desk and flopped onto my bed.

The mattress dipped down as Willow took a seat. “How are you feeling?”

“Like shit,” I said. I rolled over to look at her. “It’s just… It’s all so weird. At first, being back here, it was like the sleepovers we used to have during middle school. Now, though…” Hot tears prickled at the corner of my eyes. “I’ll never see them again… God, Will, my parents are–!”

My words crumbled with the hiccups and ragged breaths I took while trying to control my crying. Willow moved around the bed, coming closer.

“I’m sorry, Si,” she murmured. “I know that we can’t replace your family… but we’re here for you. You are one of us, okay? We won’t let you go–”

Willow’s hands touched my shoulders and she screamed. I shrieked as static sizzled between my friend and I, and she collapsed off of the bed, electricity dancing in her thick hair.

“What happened—Willow?” Basil was suddenly there, kneeling down by his baby sister. He looked up at me.

“I don’t know!” I had retreated to the very corner of my room, my face soaked with tears. “I don’t know, she tried to put her arm around me, and there was lightning, and I didn’t mean to…!”

My babbling became incoherent as their parents came into the room, and we rushed to the hospital for the second time that day.

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Posted by on June 25, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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Sunday Scribble – “Pancakes”

Pancakes

The scent of cinnamon-sprinkled apple pancakes awakened my nose and made me feel almost at home again.

This would never be home. Sure, the bed was comfortable, the sheets clean and soft, and they had given me the room with the view of the gorgeous woodlands behind the mansion, but I would never be able to think of this place as home.

A soft knock rattled my door. “Sierra, are you awake?”

I sat up, rubbing the sleep from my eyes. “Yeah. G’morning, Mrs. Foster.”

“I hope you had a good rest,” the woman said. “Breakfast is on the table whenever you are ready to come down.”

“Thank you,” I said, and didn’t move until her footsteps disappeared.

I took a deep breath and swung my legs over the bed, my feet landing in the plush rug. The sun was beginning to rise and I moved like an automated robot throughout my morning routine. It was strange, of course. I had new clothes and supplies since my house had burned down with the rest of my family.

At least, that was the story everyone was telling me. I don’t really remember much at all from that night. All I recalled was waking up in some sort of hospital room to the astonishment of the doctors that had been running tests on me. They had asked me the usual questions, how was I feeling, did anything hurt, that sort of thing, and I mentioned how loudly they had been talking. The three doctors had exchanged puzzled glances before one confessed that they hadn’t been talking at all right before I woke up.

“Perhaps it was a dream,” one had said.

Perhaps it was me, a voice had responded. None of the doctors had heard it, and I shook my head, trying to dislodge the ghostly voice.

It didn’t work.

I apologize, the voice had said, then rambled about the test results and what was going on with my body. It took a bit of time before I realized that it had been the heart monitor talking to me.

A machine. There had been a machine’s voice in my head, and it was totally unfazed that I was freaking out about it. I may have babbled to the doctors about it, but I got shushed in response.

“It’s okay,” one of them had said. “You’re safe here. Everything will be alright–”

“What happened?” I snapped. “Why am I here?”

They paused, a heavy pause, and no one spoke until I started writhing through the wires that were hooked up to me.

“There was an accident,” the doctor said, and that was how I was told my family was dead.

A fire had blazed through my house, and I was the sole survivor. I think I remember my father getting me out before returning to the house for my mother. Smoke inhalation had been my father’s killer. I was told Mom hadn’t even made it outside of the house.

You will be late for breakfast.

I winced at the voice. “Be quiet…”

Breakfast will be cold.

“Shut up.”

Do not be late—

“Stop talking to me!” The alarm clock fell from the nightstand with a clatter from the pillow I chucked.

“Sierra?” A firmer knock sounded on the door.

“I’m fine,” I said, trying to hide my heaving.

“Are you sure?”

“Yes,” I said, clutching the edge of my bed to help myself stand back up and ignoring the fact that I couldn’t remember falling to my knees. “I’ll be down in a few minutes, Basil.”

I heard him sigh. “Okay. See you in a few.”

I’m sure he’d come back for me if I didn’t show up, and that was the only reason why I composed myself enough in order to keep my word.

I was the last to arrive in the dining room and took my seat — the added seat at the table, the odd one out — next to Willow. Her eyes were bright with the morning, but her mouth was too full of pancakes to properly wish me hello. Mrs. Foster gave me a smile, which I returned, from her seat at the head of the table, while Mr. Foster nodded at me before returning to the stock reports in his newspaper. Azalea and Camellia across the table barely glanced at me while they gossiped. Basil caught my eye and I smiled at him as well, hoping to portray that he needn’t worry about the girl that could hear machines talk.

I began to eat, but the nostalgia of the pancakes struck me like a bolt. It was thoughtful of the Fosters to prepare my favorite breakfast, but it just reminded me that this was not my home, that I could never go home again.

Home is where your family is. This wasn’t my family.

 
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Posted by on June 18, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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Sunday Scribble – “Evolution”

Evolution

An older couple entered the lobby. I sat back in my seat from behind the counter, watching them walk forward with the kind of “We’re too old to give a shit about anything” air. A teenage boy shuffled in behind them, making no effort to hide his awe of the facility. His wandering gaze eventually spotted me and he beamed. One side of my lips quirked in response before my eyes returned to my book. Firm footsteps reached my ears and I glanced back up to see Dr. Levi catch up to the couple with an outstretched hand.

“Hello,” Dr. Levi said, and introduced himself. “This must be young Edward. How are you today, young man?”

“Fine.” Edward’s tone was light, confident, but curt. His hands were stuffed in his pockets and his torso was angled back toward the exit.

“Good to hear.” The doctor smiled at the teenager before returning his attention to the older couple. “Thank you for coming here today. I’m sure you’re curious as to why we are interested in your grandson.”

“You said it had to do with his music,” the grandfather said. “Is it all the rock and rap crap that he listens to nowadays? See, Edith, I told you that stuff would rot his brain.”

“It’s a freedom of expression, Hank,” the grandma retorted. Her raspy voice cracked when she had tried to speak louder. “As long as he’s not smoking, drinking, or going out and selling his body–”

“Nana!” Edward, with his face burning, reached over and settled a hand on his grandmother’s shoulder. To me, it looked as if he wanted to reach further and cover up her mouth.

Dr. Levi cleared his throat. “Well, that’s not exactly why we contacted you… Have you folks ever heard of mutants?”

“What, is that a new drug?” Hank asked.

“No, not at all,” the doctor said. “See, when a species evolves–”

“Evolution is blasphemy,” Edith interrupted, her lips pursing, and I thought she would spit on Dr. Levi’s shoes for even uttering the word. Edward’s head dropped into his hands as she ranted. “If you were a God-fearing Christian, you would know that. When was the last time you stepped foot in a church?”

Dr. Levi took a step back and realized that the other doctors had disappeared, none willing to help him with the crotchety old couple.

“Last Sunday,” I said. Hank jumped at the sound of my voice and I waved when he looked my way. I continued on. “God created us, yes, but he had to give us the ability to adapt to this growing world, right? I mean, He promised He wouldn’t destroy this world again, so we need some help to keep up with the changes.”

“Girlie, you’re saying that evolution is an act of God?” Edith asked.

I shrugged. “It must be,” I said. “I’m proof of that. And so is your grandson.”

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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Wonder Woman

wonder-woman2

I didn’t realize how much I had needed this movie until I actually saw it.

I grew up with an uncle who had no problem introducing me to the likes of Batman and comic superheroes. While we focused more on the Dark Knight himself and the X-Men from Marvel, Wonder Woman was there in the background. I really got a sense of her when I had started watching the Justice League cartoon. With that said, I was really excited the more I heard about the Wonder Woman movie when it was getting closer to the release date.

Superhero movies are pretty much the norm now in theaters, and I remember being excited when I first heard about the giant plan to bring the Avengers together in an epic series of movies. Yet, while the movies that I saw were excellent, I got a bit burned out with the series. I saw the first two Iron Man movies, Captain America, Thor, the Guardians of the Galaxy and… I think that’s it for the Marvel movies, in all honesty. I would like to catch up one day.

Wonder Woman was the first of the DC movies that I saw, which is a bit surprising considering how much of a Batman fan I am. Of course, I heard that the DC movies were a bit weak compared to Marvel’s movies, but after seeing Wonder Woman, I am more willing to give the DC movies a try, if only to keep up for when Justice League comes out.

Wonder Woman as a movie was fantastic. I adored the story line, Diana herself, Steve Trevor, the supporting characters, the scenery (like, holy sugar, did you see how vibrant and gorgeous Themyscira was?!), and the action sequences, especially the action sequences. Seeing the Amazons charge into battle to protect each other and their home made me tear up.

These women were the epitome of strength and it was about damn time we saw that on the big screen. Because, while Black Widow is important and an awesome character, we need more powerful women fighting the good fight. Like, guys, it’s amazing what you can do and I totally understand how you all can seem so confident and ready to take on a thousand bad guys after seeing a superhero like you do the same.

Because, for the first time in my 27 years of life, I felt the same way.

I felt the same way after seeing Diana Prince unabashedly go out in the world to protect what is dear to her, to simply do something to save the world and the innocent people in it. She exuded confidence and power, perhaps not fully understanding how the world worked, but knowing that she could do something to help.

I’m just so proud of how well this movie has done and I’m so looking forward to more installments with Wonder Woman. I hope everyone else who has seen this movie enjoyed it as well!

 
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Posted by on June 7, 2017 in Home

 

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Reboots

I enjoy reading comic books. Combining stories with beautiful pictures was always fascinating to me.

Growing up, thanks to my uncle’s influence, I read a few superhero comics like Batman and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, but I also fell in love with the Archie comics. The goofy situations of the perpetual high schoolers always amused me and I loved the friendship dynamic of the characters. For years, my uncle would get me a year’s worth of a subscription for the Archie comics. We recently stopped them only due to me not being able to spend as much time just lounging around and reading the comics lately.

25852959Nevertheless, I still pick up a digest of the comics every once in a while and, recently, my family and I visited the Amazon Bookstore where I picked up Volume One of the new Archie comics. I had mixed feelings on the reboot only due to nostalgia, but I was able to appreciate the new art style and the fact that the writers wanted to reach out to newer readers.

Volume One has the first six issues and I enjoyed the characters, finding many of them to be fairly true to the original series. There are a couple of characters (side characters, mind you) that I’m annoyed at for causing unnecessary strife, but I suppose it’s on par for high school conflicts. Nevertheless, I wouldn’t mind picking up the next volume at some point to see how the story continues.

Seeing how the comic book industry almost always has reboots going on — especially superhero series! — reminds me of when a novel itself goes through a rewrite. Novels go through several drafts, sometimes completely changing itself from the first draft to the last.

How many reboots and rewrites do your stories tend to go through until you deem them as finished?

 
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Posted by on May 15, 2017 in Home

 

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Sunday Scribble – “Ripple Effect Part Six”

Ripple Effect
Part Six

The simulation was so real that I was coughing from a person’s cigar smoke as I passed him by. He gave me an odd look, which I returned, before he retreated further into his alley. I sighed and kept walking down the street.

So far I had stopped a bank robbery by commanding the electronic, sliding doors to stay shut. One of the would-be robbers tried body slamming the door; he bounced backwards and knocked himself out. His partner surrendered to the police without a fight.

After that, a guy dressed in typical mugger gear (complete with a ski mask) collided with me, dropping a hideous flowered purse. Figuring that the purse didn’t belong to him, I punched him in the nose as he tried to get up.

Yes, I had punched him instead of using my awesome super powers. It had been instinct!

He booked it down the street before I could do anything else to him. I picked up the abandoned purse and gave it a quick look-through before finding an iPhone. A young, feminine voice spoke in my mind while the screen proceeded to load up the GPS application.

Thank you, the iPhone had said. His hands were cold! Do you mind taking me back to my master?

I had complied, obviously, especially since the device had been nice to guide me with a map to its owner’s home. It took me a little while to leave after finding the lady. Simulation or not, she had just baked cookies and insisted on rewarding me with some.

Full with imaginary food, I returned to the streets and was now just wandering around. The street lamps greeted me, and I was having a short conversation with them until a random explosion shook the ground. Dark smoke billowed up on the horizon, and I took off running toward the source. Within a few minutes I was wishing that I had picked super speed as my second ability.

I reached the site eventually and immediately dived behind some wreckage when some crazy chick started blasting ice and snow from her hands. Another girl and a guy were flanking Ice Woman, and I mentally dubbed the second girl Bomber for the little explosives she was throwing everywhere. The guy was Get Away Driver, since he was packing a car’s trunk with bags while the ladies just caused chaos. Diamonds and other jewels fell out of the stuffed bags as he tried to cram them in the vehicle.

I tried to give myself a pep talk to move (Alright, Gigabyte, you’re a hero! Stop the villains!), but it was a bit difficult when exploding snowballs whizzed over my head. After reminding myself several times that it was just a simulation, I mentally stalled the car and promptly learned that this would be rated R as a game due to Get Away Driver’s choice of words.

I peeked around my wreckage shield and was abruptly thrown against a building’s wall. Get Away Driver was renamed to Mental Boy for his telekinetic ability and apparent anger issues. Stiffly, I got up from where I had landed, trying to drive the pain away with logic. Being a simulation, of course, the pain should all be in my head—

“Stupid hero,” Mental Boy said as he raised me in the air again. “What were you thinking–”

I was dropped again when Mental Boy was suddenly blasted away with fire and went down for the count. Ice Woman retaliated and her stream of snow met the fire head-on. Glancing up, I saw that my ally was a floating young man in a deep red costume decorated with flames along the sleeves. I stood up and looked at our last opponent; Bomber was forming a large explosive but, before she could throw it at Fire Man, I lashed out with my own powers.

Electricity crackled around me, and my body felt as if I was getting constant static shocks. I threw my arm toward Bomber and bolts of electricity soared toward her. As my powers made contact with her, Bomber screamed and little sparks sizzled around her even after she fell unconscious to the ground. Sparks danced around my hands and head, and I felt a pleasant tingle surge through me.

A shout and a thump interrupted my thoughts, and I turned to see Ice Woman unconscious, and Fire Man land on the ground. He walked over to me while my electricity dissipated. Despite his mask, I recognized his crooked smile.

“Darrien–”

“Shhh.” His smile grew into a smirk. “You’ll give away my secret identity. I’m Kindle in this get-up. Care to join up, Gigabyte?”

I grinned. “I’d love to.”

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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Sunday Scribble – “Ripple Effect Part Five”

Ripple Effect
Part Five

It didn’t take too much longer for Alex to get out of the shower or for dinner to be ready. All throughout dinner Alex spoke of his creation, of the different scenarios one could play through while wearing his V.R. goggles and gloves. Darrien barely spoke a word, but his quirked smile made me guess he was used to dinner being like that.

The plates were hardly off the table before Alex started tugging me toward the basement. I glanced at Darrien, about to ask if he needed help washing the dishes, but he just told us to have fun.

“Watch your step,” Alex said as he bounced down the stairs. Wall lights lit up the concrete steps and I held onto the bare wall while walking down. The landing veered off to the right, where Alex had already disappeared. I turned the corner and walked into a room that was a cross between a study and a junkyard for metal scrap.

A simple desk with a dual-monitor desktop computer was close by, a small rug under it and a shelf filled with programming books and knick-knacks next to it. Across the room was a large workbench surrounded by odd-looking devices. On the overhead shelf was smaller devices. A pen in a display case was the one that caught my eye.

“Here’s my personal Batcave,” Alex said from by the bench.

“It’s brilliant,” I said.

Alex blushed. “Thanks. Come here and put these on.”

He was actually the one to jam the V.R. goggles on my head, and it took me a minute to wrestle the gloves from him. With his excitement, he’d probably end up trying to put them on the wrong hands.

“Okay, take a seat.” Alex gestured to a chair by his workbench and he pulled out a keyboard from one of the bench’s drawers. I took a seat as he tugged up the top of the bench, revealing a hollow compartment and a flat screen monitor. He propped up the screen, turned the monitor on, and set up the some program while I gaped at the touch-screen technology.

While the keyboard and monitor searched for each other via the house’s wireless network, I watched Alex hook up my goggles’ wires to the back of the monitor.

“Where did you get these?” I asked, resisting the urge to touch the monitor’s screen.

“I built them,” he said. Before I could proclaim my disbelief, Alex tapped the side of the goggles. “I just hooked you up to the computer. I’ll be watching your brain waves while controlling the simulation. When you’re ready, just sit back, relax, and close your eyes. Let your thoughts take control.”

I nodded and took a deep breath before lounging back in the chair. For a moment, everything was dark after the goggles slid over my eyes. I was soon enthralled at a soft, pale yellow light steadily growing from the middle of the darkness until it completely enveloped me.

It felt like I was blinking as I gazed at the new room the light had transported me. The walls were the same yellow while golden streams of computer code ran up and down them. I was standing on a flat disk in the middle of it all. Within a few seconds, a small silver ball of light danced in front of my face.

“Good evening.” The masculine tone had a robotic drawl and it bobbed up and down as if bowing to me. “I am called Pip and I will be your guide.”

A trio of screens shot up in front of me out of nowhere, and a podium connected to the disk appeared by my right hand. There was only one button in the top left corner of it with a question mark label.

“I shall now explain the scenario,” Pip said. The screens showed off a city at dusk with tall skyscrapers blocking the setting sun. There was litter on the few streets that were shown, and shady-looking people smoking on street corners.

“The metropolis Goldshaft City,” Pip said, “is in dire need of heroes. Murderers, kidnappers, and robbers run rampant in the streets, and the mayor has issued a plea to any super being willing to aid the city’s police.

“Of course, it is not only the heroes whom have answered the call.” The side screens switched to play clips of citizens running and cowering in fear while powered beings fought each other by shooting lasers from their palms. “Villains also came to the city, looking for easy prey. You have answered the call as well, and have just arrived in Goldshaft.”

The movies on the screens faded away, and words appeared on the middle screen. Pip read the question aloud. “Are you a hero or a villain?”

A silly grin formed on my face as I contemplated being the bad guy, but I decided to play the hero the first time around. I was about to voice my choice when Pip said, “Please push the button of your choice.”

I looked at the podium and blinked at seeing two buttons in the middle of it. I pushed the one labeled “Hero,” and I almost lost my dinner as my hover disk soared straight up in the air.

The disk came to a sudden halt in a light blue room, and I swear I kept going before gravity came into effect. Pip had followed and made a sound as if he was clearing his nonexistent throat.

“Tech is working on that,” he said. A mirror was now in front of me and a giant menu was to its’ left. Names of various powers were listed in alphabetical order. There was accelerated healing, acid generation, aerokinetics, animal mimicry—

“Please scroll through the list and choose a power,” Pip said. I gaped at the silver light, wondering how I was supposed to go through every option. I glanced at my podium, seeing buttons in the shape of a control pad as well as the question mark button. I hit the latter.

“What is your question?” Pip asked.

“Is it possible to see these organized into categories?” I asked. Pip glowed white and the menu of powers suddenly changed to categories, such as physical-based, elements, and traveling abilities. “Thanks!”

“My pleasure.”

Although it still took me a bit of time, I eventually settled on the “technopathic” ability from the mental-based category. Speaking with and manipulating electronics wasn’t overused like super strength, and a power that had to do with computers was right up my alley.

A much shorter list of powers appeared on the screen within moments. “Please pick a secondary ability,” Pip said.

I looked through the list, noting that the powers had to do with my technopathy. There were abilities with robotics, super speed, high intelligence, even linguistics. I eventually settled for electricity manipulation; it’d probably be more helpful against a mugger than asking a street lamp to blind him, anyway.

After I made my selection, the menu changed to show thumbnails of pieces of clothing, the default being a leotard like Wonder Woman. I frowned at my reflection for wearing it, and quickly scrolled through to find a long-sleeved shirt, even if it did look tight. As I continued making a costume, I noticed most of the female pieces looking a bit skimpy, and vowed to speak to Alex about it.

“What is your question?” Pip asked after I pushed the question mark button again.

“Can I see the male costumes?”

Pip glowed white while rearranging the menu, and I noticed pieces of costumes from various heroes. I eventually picked out the standard one-piece spandex suit, and Pip brought out a menu of patterns and designs. Using the codes running along the walls as inspiration, the pattern along my costume looked like circuitry. I picked a deep green as the base color and a yellow-orange for the circuitry. The next menu was accessories, like masks and belts, and Pip recommended a simple domino mask around my eyes.

The accessories vanished and the mirror showed a simple text box. Glancing at my podium, I noticed it had morphed into a computer keyboard. Pip told me that it was time to pick my alias.

I looked back up at the mirror, at a loss for ideas, when I noticed words floating around the mirror. Lightning Lass, Thunder, Bolt, Shocker, Sparky… It took me a moment to realize they were name suggestions.

“Is your name Gigabyte?” Pip asked for confirmation after I typed in my choice. I pressed the yes button and the mirror disappeared.

“You are now ready to enter Goldshaft City,” Pip said as my surroundings began to fade into that soft light again. “If you need help, please call for me.” I vaguely wondered what time it was in the real world, but the thought disappeared as I began to see gray outlines of skyscrapers surround me.

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2017 in Scribbles

 

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